text/html; August « 2010 « Conversity.be
20Aug/100

Social media efforts: where do the budgets come from?

King Fish Media, along with Hub Spot and Junta42, recently released a new study measuring marketers’ adoption and use of social media for their company’s marketing efforts.

  • Social media strategy adoption and investment
  • Sites and tactics used by marketers
  • Strategic objectives of social media campaigns
  • Content’s role in social media
  • Social media ROI and measurement tools

According to this research, most companies currently have (72%) or will have (80%) a social media strategy
Investment in social media rises from a variety of sources:

  • tied to a specific project/custom media program (35%)
  • as an increase to the marketing budget (33%)
  • funded by moving budget to mainstream media (21%)

The responsability for social media falls

  • mainly on the marketing department (70%)
  • management (23%)
  • sales (3%)
  • IT (2%)
19Aug/100

Using Gladwell’s Tipping Point framework to assess social media success

Colleen Carrington is Strategy Director at Social Media Breakfast Seattle and Marketing, Communications and Social Media Professional at Carrington & Company.
To assess the effectiveness of social media efforts she uses Malcolm Gladwell's Tipping Point theory:
  1. the right people
  2. a sticky idea
  3. the right context
17Aug/100

Measuring the value of social media

The true ROI of social media efforts lies in the ways it helps companies get extra revenue, make savings, make processes more efficient and generate new ideas.

Filed under: Infograph No Comments
14Aug/100

“The bigger a brand gets, the smaller it should act, because no one likes big.”

This slide from Gareth Kay's presentation postdigitalbriefs2 - August 2010 not only highlights the culture change in digital, but in marketing as a whole:

Full presentation embedded below:

Filed under: Conversity, Social No Comments
11Aug/100

Role of influencers in the awareness, consideration and action phase of the consumer

The Fluent razorfish digital influence marketing survey can't let go of the funnel metaphor for marketing, but their analysis of the different phases of the consumers and the role of influencers in these phases is interesting:

  • Key influencers in specific fields have an outsized influence on brand affinity and purchasing decisions on social platforms. Key influencers typically have their own blogs, huge Twitter followings and rarely know their audiences personally.
  • Social influencers are everyday people who participate in social platforms. These users are typically in your consumer’s social graph and influence brand affinity and purchasing decisions through consumer reviews, by updating their own status and Twitter feeds and commenting on blogs and forums. In some cases the consumer knows the social influencers personally.
  • Known peer influencers are the closest to both the purchasing decision and to the consumer. They are typically family mem- bers, or part of the consumer’s inner circle. They influence the purchasing decision most directly and have to live with the results of their family member or friend’s decision as well.

Further reading:

3Aug/100

America’s biggest timesucks: social networks, gaming and email

From Deloitte’s “American Pantry Survey” 
  • 81% of consumers new-found use of coupons and loyalty programs is fun
  • 93% said they still expected to spend cautiously even if the economy improved
From PriceGrabber.com "US Shopping Behavior in this Economic Climate" survey
  • 55% of respondents to a  said they were spending more time shopping for and researching purchases on the internet this year, compared with 26% in 2009.
More in this eMarketer graph:
Further reading:
2Aug/100

Even as they expect to spend less, consumers are shopping more online

From Deloitte’s “American Pantry Survey” 
  • 81% of consumers new-found use of coupons and loyalty programs is fun
  • 93% said they still expected to spend cautiously even if the economy improved
From PriceGrabber.com "US Shopping Behavior in this Economic Climate" survey
  • 55% of respondents to a  said they were spending more time shopping for and researching purchases on the internet this year, compared with 26% in 2009.
More in this eMarketer graph:
Further reading: